Cedar Park, Texas

Historical Markers

Cedar Park Historical Marker

The pioneers who settled in Williamson County were rugged, courageous, and enterprising, as was Harriet (Hattie) Standefer’s family, who made the perilous trek from Alabama. Later Hattie married George W. Cluck, an aspiring cattle baron. Interestingly, the Clucks were some of th
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Cedar Park Cemetery

In 1901, after the death of an infant grandson, the Clucks set aside over 7 acres of land to be used as a family cemetery. Many Cluck family members are buried there, along with neighbors and friends. Later the cemetery was divided by 183, resulting in .5 acres lying east of the highw
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New Hope Baptist Church and Cemetery

Although the church was not formally chartered until 1868, services were likely held as early as 1848. From 1871 to 1919, the church was also used as a school. Originally located on the head waters of Blockhouse Creek, New Hope Baptist Church was rebuilt several times and now stands a
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Wilson-Leonard Brushy Creek Burial Site

This is the amazing discovery site of “LeAnn, the Leanderthal Lady.” In 1982, during the expansion of FM1431, archeologists discovered a female skeleton in an apparent family burial ground. The woman was lying in a fetal position, and buried with her were a grinding stone
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Cypress Creek School

Neighbors living in a scattered settlement along Cypress Creek known as Cypress neighborhood joined together to establish a school for their children in the 1860s. A small log schoolhouse was built on a hilltop above the creek. By 1877 the students had outgrown the first school, and a
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Stage Coach Marker

Minos M. Long owned and operated the Austin to Lampasas Stage Line from 1872 to 1877. Along the line were stage stops afor replacing horse teams, which were located at Running Brushy, Liberty Hill, and Burnet. After 1877, the stage line passed through Round Rock. Chiseled with “
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Minnick Family Cemetery

Established in 1876, the Minnick Family Cemetery is located in the Quest Village subdivision. Relatives of the Rev. John L. Minnick and his wife Louisa are buried there. Located off Settlement Blvd. on Turnbow Trail in the Quest Subdivision, the cemetery contains many Minnick family m
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Heritage Oak Tree

This 400-year-old majestic live oak tree is decorated with over 30,000 lights each year in December to kick off the holiday season. It stands a lofty fifty-seven feet tall with a spread of eighty feet. Located in the median on Quest Blvd., across from the Scott & White Clinic. His
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John Champion Cemetery

In 1850 at the age of 33, John Champion moved from South Carolina and lived in the home of James and Caroline Standefer on Brushy Creek. That year he married their daughter, Naomi Jane, and had seven children. The first marked burial in this cemetery is that of Naomi. He later married
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Austin and NW Railroad

The tracks we use are part of what was the Llano subdivision of the Austin division of the Southern Pacific railroad. The section from Giddings to Austin was built by the Houston & Texas Central Railroad and completed in 1871. This was the first railroad into Austin. The capital c
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Granite for the State Capitol

In the 1880’s, the arrival of the railroad helped develop western Williamson county and contributed to the construction of a new state capitol. When quarried limestone proved deficient for the new statehouse, contractors chose granite from Burnet county outcroppings. The Austin
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Emmett Cluck Homesite and Site of Railroad Foreman’s House

In 1887, a store was built for or by Emmett Cluck on the east side of the railroad. He then built his home behind and facing his store. Described as “ornate and beautiful,” an iron fence that had originally stood around the Texas State Capitol and was moved to Emmett’
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McRae Cemetery

McRae Cemetery. Located at the intersection of Cypress Creek Road and Sun Chase Blvd. Contains one marker for Monroe McRae. Others interred there include his father, Murdock McRae and wife and Monroe’s wife, Eva Dodd. 1919. The McRaes, a farming family were some of the original
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